nourish! Magazine

nourish! Magazine

Advancing food science, culinary & agrotechnology | MY • SG

Much of today’s raw seafood products are acquired locally today thanks to our thriving fishing communities along the coast which gives us a real crave for a seafood cuisine most times like the steamboat truck parking along the side of the road giving consumers a real taste of the marine delicacy. However it may require most business owners to store the raw seafood products in a proper way to maintain its freshness.

Rice is rich in complex carbohydrate. The word carbohydrate itself is blasphemous to most diet enthusiasts. Is this a misconception? Carbohydrate supplies energy to fuel the body’s physical demands. What most people do not understand is the differences in rice and how these differences work for the body. There are many different types of rice that are available in the market such as the ever common white rice, brown rice, red rice, black rice, parboiled rice, aged rice, glutinous rice, basmati etc.

Standing against the vast greenness of the glowing rice fields knowing that in a couple of months they will magically turn into sun-kissed fields of gold, one cannot help but to marvel at the magnitude of the beauty. Marvel turns into appreciation when one realizes that on these immense fields lay the starting point for the grains that may eventually land on our plates.

Besides language, culture and clothings, food is also a significant piece in the collective traditions of a community. In the communities of Northern Malaysia: Penang, Kedah, Perlis and Perak, the people are known to utilise a range of spices in crafting their unique cuisines. Many among the cooks of these communities choose to combine spices from various origins – India, the Middle East, with slight touches of colourful Thailand. Because of this, the use of lemongrass, kaffir lime, dessicated coconut, spice seeds and the like are regarded as necessity rather than choice. The North is also widely known and discussed as a food paradise in Malaysia, in large part due to the significance and specialty of its cuisine. Penangites in particular employ the use of ghee and Indian spices in their curries. In Kedah, Perlis and Perak, however, the paradigm shifts in favour of desiccated coconut. Albeit little and rather unremarkable, these little nuances of flavour, when combined in blends become nothing short of culinary magic, turning each and every Northern dish into a unique dining experience in a class of its own.

Tucked away behind a school is the last place one would think to find a deer farm. But at Felda Bukit Mendi Triang in the depths of Pahang, such a unique sight can be found. This deer farm at Elias Agro Farm Sdn. Bhd. is where the deer breeding project ‘Projek Ternakan Rusa Timorensis’ is carried out. The primary product of the farm is smoked deer meat (daging salai). The deer which are bred at the farm are of the Timorensis breed which are flown in all the way from Australia where they are commonly found. The farm started out with a small herd of 30 deer and has been constantly increasing their numbers through breeding as well as by bringing in more from Australia. As of June 2015 the herd is numbered at 100 deer but this will likely change soon once the farm and its facilities undergo a long awaited expansion.

Imagine a narrow cobblestone alleyway bustling with life. Street vendors selling fresh, vibrantly-hued local produce at every corner. Haggling housewives amongst fishmongers and grocers, having a good laugh, sharing recipes, tossing bright red tomatoes into rattan-woven shopping baskets. In an ideal world, so charming a scene would be commonplace. The need for brightly-lit, air-conditioned hypermarts decimated, such local farmers’ markets would then surely thrive. That is, however, strictly-speaking in an ideal world. Hypermarkets are, in reality, a necessity. Yet there is no disputing the benefits of buying and eating locally.

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